5 Places to Enjoy Food by the Fireplace in the Hamptons

Because everything tastes better by the fireside.

Photo courtesy of Baron’s Cove

Looking for a place to cozy up in the Hamptons this fall and winter? Read on for five of the finest fireplaces on the East End.

1. Baron’s Cove
Sag Harbor

As much as I love this Sag Harbor boîte in summer (who can resist an Adirondack chair overlooking the Bay?), I prefer it in fall and winter, as the low-ceilinged bar area lends itself to cozying up by a fire. Baron’s Cove’s warm, wooden space is defined by antique-y couches and its massive fireplace—a piece de resistance. You’ll have to arrive early to snag a spot directly in front of the flames, but there’s no reason not to get there early, considering the fact that happy hour—discounted snacks and drinks—is 4 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Baron’s Cove, 31 W. Water Street, Sag Harbor, open daily 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., (631) 725-210.

2. 1770 House
East Hampton

1770 House’s downstairs tavern is one of my favorite Hamptons hideaways. While the formal dining room upstairs is more of an occasion experience, downstairs has some delicious options, including an epic meatloaf and a loaded (albeit pricey) burger. Best of all? You can sit by the fireplace in this gorgeous Colonial tavern while sipping a selection of curated wines from the restaurant’s impressive, comprehensive list. Request a table by the fireplace in advance; this is one of the hottest winter spots in the Hamptons.

1770 House, 143 Main Street, East Hampton, open daily 5:30 to 10 p.m., (631) 324-1770. 

3. Rowdy Hall
East Hampton

I’m not sure if there’s an East End restaurant that I frequent more in fall and winter than Rowdy Hall. The Honest Man folks (La Fondita, Townline BBQ, Nick & Toni’s) serve dressed-down deliciousness in this pub. On a chilly fall afternoon, there is nowhere I’d rather be than in front of the fireplace with a crock of their truly superlative French onion soup. This restaurant is a monument to comfort food, with sandwiches, some really fine wings, and a long list of not-healthy-but-who-cares appetizers (fried pickles, anyone?).

Rowdy Hall, 10 Main Street, East Hampton, open daily 12 to 11 p.m., (631) 324-8555.

4. The American Hotel
Sag Harbor

A charming and dry spot for a lunch meeting – no outside seating today ☂️

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For the most formal winter experience around, head directly to Sag Harbor institution The American Hotel (referred to by residents simply as “The Hotel”). If the Tiffany’s lamps don’t put you in the mood for fine dining, the stately bar and dining room fireplace will. Tablecloths and fine china abound, and diners can enjoy an impressive foie gras pâté all while warming themselves by the fire. You’ll find less competition for the best tables—right in front of the fireplace—if you go for lunch. Prices are steep, but you’re paying for a slice of history—the Hotel has been operational since 1846.

The American Hotel, 45 Main Street, Sag Harbor, open daily 12 to 10 p.m., (631) 725-3535.

5. Inlet Seafood Restaurant
Montauk

Ok, technically you can’t eat by the fireplace, since it’s on the ground floor of this Gin Beach-adjacent restaurant (dining is on the second floor, with an unobstructed view of the Bay). But you can certainly bring your drink downstairs and enjoy it when you’re finished eating. Couches flank this gas fireplace, so you can put your feet up and relax, cocktail in hand. Upstairs, you can order some of the Hamptons’ best sushi, from fish that has just come in off the docks. The restaurant closes for a few months from late fall into mid-winter (mid-November through mid-February), so get there while the nights are cool—but not cold.

Inlet Seafood, 541 East Lake Drive, Montauk, open Fridays through Sundays, 12 to 9 p.m. (631) 668-4272. 

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Hannah Selinger

Hannah Selinger is a freelance food and wine writer and sommelier living in Sag Harbor. Her work has appeared in the such publications as the New York Times, the Washington Post, and RawStory.com. She is the wine columnist for the Southampton Press.