Montauk in the Off-Season 2016

Grab some grub where the local do.

Happy Hour 3-5 today

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The 54th Friends of Erin St. Patrick’s Day Parade is just around the corner. The shenanigans that ensue give Montauk businesses a much needed bump to those who choose to stay open year-round. 

“People still work in the winter and need a good meal,” says Gringo’s Burrito Grill owner Matthew Meehan of the appreciative locals.

“We want to feed you, we are here for you.” Get a Burrito Card, and the 11th burrito is on them. Open for lunch and dinner, seven days a week.

Montaukers start their day with fresh juices and organic breakfast at Naturally Good Food and Cafe . We usually hit the aisles on Sunday to pick up provisions for the week. I can’t live without my Fire Cider and Coconut Bliss ice-cream. Open Monday through Saturday: 7 a.m. to 5:30. They sleep in on Sunday: 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Pancake lovers head to Mr. John’s Pancake House. It is what it is, bub. A greasy spoon, and the locals wouldn’t want it any other way. The institution opens 6 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m every day. Across Main Street, Anthony’s Pancake House also has a ’50s vibe. Both have been around longer than that.

Pizza Village and Sausages Pizza and Pastabilities flank the village. Don’t ask me which one is better. They’re equally as good, OK? Both deliver.

As does Wok N’ Roll. Bring-Your-Own-Fish (BYOF) or just order your favorite Chinese dish and sink into the restaurant’s deep banquets, open daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

O’Murphy’s Pub and Restaurant is also open daily. On the weekends, they serve a traditional Irish breakfast: imported Irish sausage, Irish bacon, black and white pudding (pig’s blood, barley, meat) two eggs, half grilled tomato and brown bread. Lunch/brunch 11:30 a.m., dinner at 5 p.m.

Scarpetta Beach is surviving it’s first winter dishing out “soulful Italian” overlooking the Atlantic ocean at Gurney’s Inn, from 5:30 p.m. every night.

The Harvest on Fort Pond

is probably the hottest dinner spot in Montauk at the moment, especially considering it’s sister restaurant

East by Northeast

(my Montauk favorite) is closed for renovations until March 19.

The Harvest on Fort Pond is probably the hottest dinner spot in Montauk at the moment, especially considering it’s sister restaurant East by Northeast (my Montauk favorite) is closed for renovations until March 19. During winter, the long-time staple is cozy, warm and just what you crave. Hey, I’d be happy with the country bread (crispy crust, soft and airy inside served with hot pepper infused olive oil) and wine ($20 bottles everyday but Saturday) but why quit there? Their family-style menu items are now being offered in half portions. Open Wednesday through Sunday at 5 p.m.

Montauk chowder, curry mussels and half-priced bottles of wine will warm you up at Swallow East. Open Thursday and Friday at 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at noon.

The Saltbox and Inlet Seafood restaurants are open Friday, Saturday and Sundays for lunch and dinner. Even though the crowds have dwindled, you can still get your lobster roll on at the Saltbox. For sushi, head to the Inlet. Opens at noon for lunch, then the menu switches to dinner at 4 p.m., just in time for the sunset over the inlet.

Thirsty? Everyone’s favorite bar, the Montauket is open every night for your drinking pleasure. Salty, with a view of Fort Pond Bay, at 88 Firestone Road. Opens 2 p.m. during the week and 11 a.m. on weekends

Montauk Brewing Company is open Thursday and Friday 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. “Around St. Patrick’s Day we will be open every day,” says co-founder Vaughan Cutillo.

Most other businesses will reopen around Memorial Day. In the meantime, off-season is a perfect time to take a hike on the cliffs of Shadmoor or a seal walk from the Montauk Lighthouse, then grab some grub.

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Kelly Ann Smith lives in East Hampton between Gardiner's Bay and Accabonac Harbor. She's been writing about the East End since 1995. Her weekly column, "A View from Bonac," can be found in the East Hampton Press.