June and July

 

clammer in water with waders and rake

In June and July, the warming days begin to drive spring crops out of fields and generate our first summer flavors. Some last asparagus will be kicking around, peas and spinach will remain if it’s not too hot. Turnips and radishes start to plump. And greens like chard, kale, collards and lettuces are as leafy and abundant as ever. Leeks, onions and garlic reach their zenith. There are new potatoes to dig by July. The season’s first fruit begins with strawberries in June, blackberries and raspberries later in the month, and cherries by the 4th of July, foreshadowing the melons and peaches of high summer. With the aid of greenhouses and floating row covers, some farmers are even coaxing tomatoes, sweet corn, cukes, zukes and other summer crops to ripen by mid-July. In the water, shellfish are abundant and succulent (they don’t begin to spawn until end of July and into August). Bluefish appear in droves, starting with snappers and cocktail blues, and growing into four- and five-pound monsters by the time full-size spuds are dug in August. Stripers aren’t far behind, but remain more coy until fall. Sea robin, blackfish, triggerfish and other underestimated marine characters start surprising fishers and the people they feed. •

stacked cheese rounds

JUNE AND JULY

PRODUCE
Beans
Beets
Blackberries
Blueberries
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Cherries
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Fennel
Garlic
Greens (Chard,
Collards, Kale,
Mustard, Spinach)
Leeks
Jerusalem
Artichokes
Melons
Mushrooms
(farmed and wild)
Nectarines
Onion
Peaches
Peas
Peppers
Plums
Potatoes (new)
Radishes
Summer Squash
Turnips
Zucchini

a pile of purple string beans fills the frame

MEAT & SEAFOOD
American Eel
Blackfish
Black Sea Bass
Blowfish
Blue Crab
Bluefish
Butterfish
Chicken & Eggs
Clams
Conch
Dogfish
Duck
Flounder
Fluke
Lobster
Mackerel
Mako
Milk & Cheese
Monkfish
Mussels
Oysters
Perch
Porgies
Striped Bass
Sea Robin
Sea Scallop
Sake
Squid
Swordfish
Tilefish
Tuna
Turkey
Weakfish
Whitebait

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